Last edited by Vojas
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of The race against lethal microbes found in the catalog.

The race against lethal microbes

The race against lethal microbes

learning to outwit the shifty bacteria, viruses, and parasites that cause infectious diseases

  • 88 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by The Institute in Chevy Chase, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Communicable diseases -- Microbiology,
  • Tuberculosis,
  • Parasitic diseases,
  • Tuberculosis -- Epidemiology

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    Statementa report from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
    ContributionsHoward Hughes Medical Institute.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination56 p. :
    Number of Pages56
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14416235M
    OCLC/WorldCa35710740

    Frantic, Steffanie combed through research old and new and came across phage theory: the idea that the right virus, aka “the perfect predator,” can kill even the most lethal bacteria. Phage treatment had fallen out of favor almost years ago, after antibiotic use went mainstream.   Our best defenses against infectious disease could cease to work, surgical procedures would become deadly, and we might return to a world where even small cuts are life-threatening. The problem of drug resistance already kills over one million people across the .

    Many of us have developed a new fascination for viruses and virology during the global COVID crisis. Here, Dorothy Crawford, professor of medical microbiology and the author of Viruses: A Very Short Introduction, selects five of the best books on viruses for the general reader.. Interview by Cal Flyn. Part I A Deadly Hitchhiker. Blindsided 3. 1 A Menacing Air 7. 2 The Last Supper 3 Disease Detectives 4 First Responders 5 Lost in Translation 6 The Colonel from Al-Shabaab Tom: Interlude I 7 A Deadly Hitchhiker 8 "The Worst Bacteria on the Planet" Tom: Interlude II Part II Can't Eskape. 9 Homecoming

    That’s the question posed by the book Superbugs: An Arms Race against Bacteria. [The] authors look at the rise of drug resistance, and their research is sobering. [The] authors look at the rise of drug resistance, and their research is sobering. But the finding does add a new player to an evolutionary arms race that pits newts against garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis). Some snakes living in the same regions as toxic newts have developed resistance to TTX. These snakes can then feast on TTX-laden newts. It’s possible that Pseudomonas bacteria have become more abundant on newts over.


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The race against lethal microbes Download PDF EPUB FB2

“McCarthy gives an insider’s look at the history of antibiotics and the urgent fight against deadly, drug-resistant bacteria.”—People “In his new book, Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic, Dr.

McCarthy offers a glimmer of hope: a new way to both cure and prevent future superbug infections with a single treatment.”—Christian Broadcasting NetworkCited by: 1. The race against lethal microbes: learning to outwit the shifty bacteria, viruses, and parasites that cause infectious diseases Author: Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

“McCarthy gives an insider’s look at the history of antibiotics and the urgent fight against deadly, drug-resistant bacteria.”—People “In his new book, Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic, Dr.

McCarthy offers a glimmer of hope: a new way to both cure and prevent future superbug infections with a single treatment.”—Christian Broadcasting Network. Shelves: memoir A compelling medical mystery turned thriller race against time and death—this memoir is even more than that.

It's an emotional journey with the author as she tells of her frantic efforts to save her husband's life by finding the "perfect predator" capable of /5. Physician, researcher, and ethics professor Matt McCarthy is on the front lines of a groundbreaking clinical trial testing a new antibiotic to fight lethal superbugs, bacteria that have built up resistance to the life-saving drugs in our rapidly dwindling arsenal.4/5(90).

This book is a sobering account of our general lack of preparedness for a variety of pandemic illnesses. As described by the author, the potential for social devastation from unchecked disease or related problems, such as the rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria, is much greater than most people realize/5().

That’s the question posed by the book Superbugs: An Arms Race against Bacteria. [The] authors look at the rise of drug resistance, and their research is sobering.” ―Late Night Live (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)Reviews: 8. What happens when the race to stop a lethal bacteria becomes a race to stop a killer vaccine.

Richard Mabry’s book, Lethal Remedy, is a suspense that includes high-level managerial participants, with one anonymous snitch/5(62). Book: Superbugs: An Arms Race Against Bacteria Antibiotics are powerful drugs that can prevent and treat infections, but they are becoming less effective as a result of drug resistance.

Resistance develops because the bacteria that antibiotics target can evolve ways to defend themselves against these drugs. Antibiotics are powerful drugs that can prevent and treat infections, but they are becoming less effective as a result of drug resistance. Resistance develops because the bacteria that antibiotics target can evolve ways to defend themselves against these drugs.

When antibiotics fail, there is very little else to prevent an infection from spreading. Unnecessary use of antibiotics in both humans. Superbugs: An Arms Race against Bacteria [Hall, William, McDonnell, Anthony, O'Neill, Jim, Davies, Matthew Lloyd] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Superbugs: An Arms Race against BacteriaReviews: 8. "An amazing, informative book that changes our perspective on medicine, microbes and our future." (Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD, New York Times best-selling author of The Emperor of All Maladies) A New York Times best-selling author shares this exhilarating story of cutting-edge science and the race against the clock to find new treatments in the fight against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as superbugs/5(24).

by Matt McCarthy A New York Times bestselling author shares this exhilarating story of cutting-edge science and the race against the clock to find new treatments in the fight against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as superbugs.

The proverbial ticking clock will keep readers on the edge of their seats. --Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD, New York Times bestselling author of The Emperor of All Maladies A New York Times bestselling author shares this exhilarating story of cutting-edge science and the race against the clock to find new treatments in the fight against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as superbugs.

“McCarthy gives an insider’s look at the history of antibiotics and the urgent fight against deadly, drug-resistant bacteria.” — People “In his new book, Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic, Dr.

McCarthy offers a glimmer of hope: a new way to both cure and prevent future superbug infections with a single treatment.” —Christian Broadcasting Network. In his new book "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic," McCarthy shares the story of cutting-edge science and the race against the clock to find new treatments in the fight against the.

Buy Justice Ascending: A unputdownable read of dangerous race for survivial against a deadly bacteria (The Scorpius Syndrome) by Zanetti, Rebecca (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: Books; Superbugs the race to stop an epidemic Matt McCarthy ‘Written from the front lines in the battle against resistant microbes, the author’s own father-in-law, who contracts a deadly staph infection.

And we learn about the ethics of medical research: why potentially life-saving treatments are often delayed for years to protect. Antibiotics are powerful drugs that can prevent and treat infections, but they are becoming less effective as a result of drug resistance.

Superbugs describes this growing global threat, the systematic failures that have led to it, and solutions that governments, industries, and public health specialists can adopt.

OK, you know the book is about the race to get anti-toxin serum to the residents of Nome, Alaska. An incipient diphtheria epidemic threatened. This has come to be known as The Serum Run to Nome. 20 mushers and about sled dogs, primarily Siberian Huskies, raced miles ( km) in five and a half days from Nenana in central Alaska /5().

'This dark, post-apocalyptic tale is a testament to the power of hope and love against all odds' Romantic Times. It's a dangerous race for survival in the aftermath of a deadly bacteria spreading across the globe. Can love still shine in the darkness? Before Scorpius, Tace Justice was a good ole Texas cowboy who served his s:   The WHO said the 12 bacteria have built-in abilities to find new ways to resist treatment and can pass along genetic material that allows other bacteria to become drug-resistant as well.Unnecessary use of antibiotics in both humans and animals accelerates the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria, with potentially catastrophic personal and global consequences.

Our best defenses against infectious disease could cease to work, surgical procedures would become deadly, and we might return to a world where even small cuts are life.